The History of Veterans Day | Spirit Mountain Casino
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The History of Veterans Day

November 10, 2016

Tomorrow, the Spirit Mountain Casino community is showing our gratitude to all of the men and women who have served our country. We owe them for their loyalty, their bravery, and their sacrifice. Each day we feel thankful.

Brave individuals have been serving our country for centuries, but Veterans Day only became recognized as a national holiday in 1919. Here’s an at-a-glance timeline of this important military holiday:

What inspired Veterans Day?
World War I raged on for more than four years before officially coming to a close in June of 1919. More than 4 million Americans served in "The war to end all wars.”

Why November 11th?
Although the war technically ended in 1919, forces stopped fighting before the Treaty of Versailles was signed. On November 11th, 1918 the Allies and Germany reached an armistice. This event, commonly referred to as the "Eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month," marked a ceasefire that held until the end of World War I.

Who initiated Veterans Day?
In 1919, exactly one year after the armistice, then-President Woodrow Wilson said, “To us in America the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with—solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service, and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of nations.”

Was it always called ‘Veterans Day?’
No. ‘Armistice Day’ was renamed ‘Veterans Day’ in 1954. This idea was inspired after the close of World War II when Eisenhower signed a bill stating that the day should honor all veterans, not solely those who fought in World War I.

Why isn’t there an apostrophe in the name?
Although you might be tempted to write the holiday as “Veterans’” or “Veteran’s” Day, resist! The Department of Veteran Affairs prefers to leave the apostrophe out to signify that the day belongs to each and every veteran of the United States.

Feeling inspired? Take tomorrow to reach out to all of the veterans you know - they deserve our gratitude! The Spirit Mountain Casino community is honored to live in a country where brave individuals devote their lives to our rights and freedoms. This day is for you, veterans!


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